Thomas O’Norris The truth is that

$\begingroup$ That’s true. It makes you want to get the exercise done! $\endgroup$ However, I am still adamant in my claim that you can not be taught discrete mathematics by this book because one of the requirements for this book is an understanding in the basics of discrete mathematics. The book needs an understanding of discrete math that is way beyond what a programmers needs to be aware of.1 The book is able to answer the question that is in the title, however it does not consider the rest of the query where the person is seeking a resource that will help him develop the fundamental understanding of discrete math that could be required for more understanding of algorithms."$endgroupthe endgroup Actually, I think this book is designed for computer scientists who are at the upper grades of an undergraduate degree or those who are the beginning of a graduate degree. $\endgroup$ The introduction to this book explicitly states it’s not a stand-in for a textbook in discrete math. "$begingroup$ @Thomas O’Norris The truth is that it was an attempt to make an existing program similar to the one you described which was in place within Stanford in order to increase its accessibility.1 It’s a bad response to that question. $\endgroup$ This is the reason for the preface in The second edition. $\endgroup$ Distinction Math understanding is required to master the validity and complex nature of data structures and algorithms. $\begingroup$ That’s true.

They will teach these in the Algo/DS textbooks, however, you can only attain math proficiency through practicing discrete math.1 However, I am still adamant in my claim that you can not be taught discrete mathematics by this book because one of the requirements for this book is an understanding in the basics of discrete mathematics. Knuth book is great to use for that. The book is able to answer the question that is in the title, however it does not consider the rest of the query where the person is seeking a resource that will help him develop the fundamental understanding of discrete math that could be required for more understanding of algorithms."$endgroupthe endgroup But, IMHO that you’ll only require it when conducting advanced proofs using Algorithms/DS.1 The introduction to this book explicitly states it’s not a stand-in for a textbook in discrete math. For a beginner, it would be great to go over "Grimaldi" http://www.amazon.com/Discrete-Combinatorial-Mathematics-Applied-Introduction/dp/0201199122 and then quickly move to Algorithms.

It’s a bad response to that question. $\endgroup$ If not, you’ll continue learning more about Discrete Math and never get to Algorithms/DS.1 Distinction Math understanding is required to master the validity and complex nature of data structures and algorithms. Be aware that Discrete Math does not teach students how to design methods or structures for data. They will teach these in the Algo/DS textbooks, however, you can only attain math proficiency through practicing discrete math.1 It is only through working on Algorithm problems with topcoder ACM icpc, spoj and reading books about Algos/DS or courses about them.

Knuth book is great to use for that. A good textbook for learning discrete mathematics at the undergraduate level includes The Kenneth Rosen book titled Discrete Mathematics and its Applications.1 But, IMHO that you’ll only require it when conducting advanced proofs using Algorithms/DS. The book contains solutions to a majority of the problems. For a beginner, it would be great to go over "Grimaldi" http://www.amazon.com/Discrete-Combinatorial-Mathematics-Applied-Introduction/dp/0201199122 and then quickly move to Algorithms.1 You can also purchase the Student’s Solution Guide. If not, you’ll continue learning more about Discrete Math and never get to Algorithms/DS.

I don’t have it, however I would believe that it contains an answer to remaining portion of the questions or gives a step-by step guide to solving the problem (the book is only providing the an answer to the question with no explanation of the answers).1 Be aware that Discrete Math does not teach students how to design methods or structures for data. It’s used to teach the two-quarter series that is part of Discrete Mathematics that is taken by computer science and software engineering majors as well being used in various mathematics courses offered at my school.1 It is only through working on Algorithm problems with topcoder ACM icpc, spoj and reading books about Algos/DS or courses about them. I kept the book throughout my course, and I’m making use of it to refresh my mathematical skills that are discrete in preparation for taking my Certified Software Development Associate exam.1

A good textbook for learning discrete mathematics at the undergraduate level includes The Kenneth Rosen book titled Discrete Mathematics and its Applications. The $begingroup$ Rosen book that you linked to there are a lot of reviewers have complained that it’s a paperback edition and that it’s quite different than the hardback textbook used in the majority of classes.1 The book contains solutions to a majority of the problems. Did you mean to support either the hardback or paperback? $\endgroup$ You can also purchase the Student’s Solution Guide.

There are many different areas for discrete math, as well as many excellent books. I don’t have it, however I would believe that it contains an answer to remaining portion of the questions or gives a step-by step guide to solving the problem (the book is only providing the an answer to the question with no explanation of the answers).1 There’s Graph Theory by Diestel, with a free PDF version to download from.

It’s used to teach the two-quarter series that is part of Discrete Mathematics that is taken by computer science and software engineering majors as well being used in various mathematics courses offered at my school. theres generatingfunctionology by wilf, free pdf version at.1 I kept the book throughout my course, and I’m making use of it to refresh my mathematical skills that are discrete in preparation for taking my Certified Software Development Associate exam.

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